Research

All funds donated to Leukaemia & Lymphoma NI remain in Northern Ireland to support our many projects here.

We fund laboratory based research, clinical support and education.

More information on our current projects is available below.

  • Core Support

    Stem Cell Harvest Grant

    A research technician, Anne Jordan, is supported by this grant undertakes the assessment of stem cell harvests, processing of samples collected through the NI BioBank and other research projects.

    General Consumables Grant

    Recurrent grant to cover recurrent consumables and small pieces of equipment for all projects on blood cancer research in the CCRCB

    Core Tissue Culture Grant

    Recurrent grant to cover the reagents and plastic ware for tissue culture studies across all projects undertaken in the blood cancer research group

    Haematology Development Grant

    Recurrent grant awarded to the Professor of Experimental Haematology to support blood cancer research.  The funding has been used to enable short term extensions to contracts for post-docs or graduate students; support for visiting scientists and students; purchase and maintenance of medium scale equipment; attendance at conferences, workshops and other events by covering travel, accommodation and registration; and cost of publishing manuscripts for open access.

  • Education

    Summer research students

    This grant funds up to five summer research studentships in blood cancer research in the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB) at Queen’s University Belfast.

    The students undertake an 8-week research project to complement the on-going studies.

  • Clinical Support

    Clinical Trials Research Nurse

    Funding a much needed clinical research nurse support to help deliver and develop a portfolio of clinical trials in myeloma, leukaemia and lymphoma, each with their own series of objectives and endpoints.

    Financial Support for Northern Ireland patients in trials NCRI AML18 and NCRI AML19

    This grant supported the opening of the AML18 and 19 Clinical trials across Northern Ireland by providing provision for specific drugs to be included in the trail protocol/

  • Pan-Myeloid malignancies

    My BLOCk

    “My BLOCk”, myeloid blood cancers initiative, has the aims of integrating sequencing of diagnostic and relapse samples from patients with MDS, AML and MPN with drug screens.

    It is hoped that the best therapeutic option or combinations would be identified for the patient in relation to their mutational profile during the course of their disease.

  • AML

    RNA Methylases as a Therapeutic Target

    This award was given to Drs Fiona Furlong and Jaine Blayney to undertake a project to profile chemical modifications on long non-coding RNA as a novel mechanisms controlling AML differentiation.  This award was given under the LLNI scheme of supporting pilot projects from early stage researchers with the aim of moving towards larger grants from other funders.

    Venom toxins as a therapeutic option

    One of the 2019 LLNI funded studentships, and jointly supervised by Prof. Karen McCloskey, James Boncan is studying how components of snake venom toxins may be utilised as a novel therapeutic agent.

    In addition, the project will examine important aspects how chemicals such as calcium are pumped in and out of leukaemia cells – a mechanism that may be exploited to increase the uptake of drugs.

    Elucidating the role of chromatin and epigenetic modifiers in AML

    Deidra Venney, the second of the 2019 students, will study how chromatin is remodelled and modulated in AML.  With co-supervisor, Dr Adone Mohd-Sarip, the project will understand how these processes impact on the development and progression of AML.

    Drug repurposing using multi-omics data

    This student, Paul Strain, will utilise the power of computational biology to understand how we could identify drug combinations from around 800 drugs.

    A simple pairwise analysis would involve 80,000 reactions but using innovative approaches this should be able to be reduced to a more realistic and cost-effective number.

    The student will be co-supervised by Dr Jaine Blayney.

  • ALL

    Karyo-sequencing

    A pilot grant, awarded to Prof David Gonzalez Sanchez will develop and assess a novel next-generation sequencing platform for the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative malignancies

  • CML

    We currently do not have any projects dedicated to Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia.

    Published research from our previous projects is available on our LLNI Funded Publications.

  • CLL

    Determination of mutational status in CLL

    This project, undertaken by Dr Mark Catherwood, is supported within the Haematology Development Grant.  Dr Catherwood is based in the haematology molecular diagnostic laboratories in Belfast City Hospital.

    His studies contribute too many UK and EU research networks including the European Research Consortium for CLL (ERIC).

  • MDS/AML

    Alison Williamson / LLNI Ph.D. Studentship

    This project, undertaken by Harmony Black, is investigating how mutations of the STAG2 gene have impacted on the ability of the cell to repair DNA damage as a result of disrupted chromatin student involving the cohesin complex.

  • MPN

    Myeloproliferative disorders: An In-Depth Case Control (MOSAICC) Study

    This grant was awarded to Professor Mary Frances McMullin to conduct a UK-wide case-control study of MPNs to validate potential risk factors and identify additional exposure risks.

  • Myeloma

    Lectureship in Blood Cancers

    This grant funds a Lectureship post for Dr Lisa Crawford. Dr Crawford’s principle research interests lie in understanding how alterations in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) contribute to the pathogenesis of Multiple Myeloma and applying this knowledge to identify opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

    The consequences of HUWE1 mutations in Myeloma

    This project, undertaken by Jonathan Morgan, is investigating the role of the E3 ligase HUWE1 in DNA replication in Myeloma cells and aims to explore whether dysregulation of HUWE1 contributes to genomic instability in Myeloma.

    DNA damage repair in Myeloma

    PhD student Roisin McAvera is investigating how loss of a gene (TRIM33), which is observed in about 20% of patients, affects the ability of myeloma cells to repair DNA damage. It is hoped that a better understanding of the role of TRIM33 may open up opportunities to therapeutically exploit DNA repair defects in these patients.

  • Lymphoma

    Karyo-sequencing

    A pilot grant, awarded to Prof David Gonzalez Sanchez will develop and assess a novel next-generation sequencing platform for the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative malignancies

AMRC.org.uk
AMRC.org.uk
ResearchFish.net
ResearchFish.net

LLNI Funded Publications

You can view a list of Publications which LLNI has helped to fund:

Our Research Team

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Patrick G Johnston Centre for Cancer Research, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast BT9 7AE

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